Tuesday, 21 August 2018

Film Review: "Crazy Rich Asians" (2018).


"The only thing crazier than love is family." This is Crazy Rich Asians. This romantic comedy-drama film directed by Jon M. Chu, adapted by Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim, based on the 2013 novel of the same name by Kevin Kwan. The story follows native New Yorker Rachel Chu as she accompanies her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young, to his best friend's wedding in Singapore, and meet his family.

Interest in a film adaptation began shortly after the publication of Kwan's comedic novel on June 11, 2013. In August, producer Nina Jacobson acquired the film rights. Initially one of the producers proposed to cast a Caucasian actress in the role of Rachel Chu, which prompted Kwan to option his novel for just $1 in exchange for a major role in the creative and development process. The producers' goal was to produce the film outside the studio system and to structure financing for development and production from Asia and other territories outside the United States. In 2014, the US-based Asian film investment group Ivanhoe Pictures partnered with Jacobson to finance and produce the film. Soon afterwards, Lim and Chiarelli were hired to adapt the novel. In May 2016, Chu entered negotiations to direct. He was hired soon afterwards after giving executives a visual presentation about his experience as a first-generation Asian-American. In October, Warner Bros. Pictures acquired the project after what Variety called a "heated" bidding war. Netflix reportedly fervently sought worldwide rights to the project, offering "artistic freedom, a greenlighted trilogy and huge, seven-figure-minimum paydays for each stakeholder, upfront." However, Chu and company wanted a wide theatrical release. Constance Wu, newcomer Henry Golding, legend Michelle Yeoh, Gemma Chan, Lisa Lu, Awkwafina, Ken Jeong, Chris Pang, and Sonoya Mizuno rounded the film's cast. Making it the first Western-produced film with an exclusively Asian cast since The Joy Luck Club (1993). Principal photography began in late April 2017. The film was shot on location in Malaysia and Singapore.

The film stars Wu, Golding, Yeoh, Chan, Lu, Awkwafina, Jeong, Pang, and Mizuno. One of the film's illuminating elements is its cast, whom all gave elegant performances that will resonate with all ethnicities and generations. It presents images of Asians outside the narrow range of exotically oriental, subordinate, and submissive stock supporting / side characters.

Crazy Rich Asians is a superb achievement, thanks to director Jon M. Chu's impressive visual skills, and its emotionally heart-rending study of family. Making it a well-done propaganda for cultural diversity, and a well mounted adaptation of the best seller. It gives a refreshing, and poignant, dimension to Asian culture and society. The film covers primal issues of Asian culture, such as family, responsibility, love, and self-respect, that pounds you with pathos. Despite the cultural-specific nature of the story, there are a lot of overriding themes explored here that have a universal scope and appeal. Even if its meanings are limited or wanly inspirational at times. Overall, it is one of the most satisfying step forward for screen representation.

Simon says Crazy Rich Asians receives:


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